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Lakes, Rivers, and More in the Northern Adirondacks

Northern Adirondack Fishing, Paddling & Boating

Below are bodies of water that are partially or entirely located in the Northern Adirondacks. This includes the Santa Clara Flow, Chazy Lake, and more!

Please note, this list is not exhaustive and is only meant to be a starting point for your Adirondack adventures!

northern lake champlain

Lakes And Ponds

Union Falls Flow

Union Falls Flow is a prime location for anglers looking to catch walleye in the Adirondacks. Anglers should look for fish along the edges of the old Saranac River channel, and use traditional walleye techniques. Union Falls Flow also has northern pike and yellow perch in it's waters. Anglers can use a launch at a private campground (small fee) and the launch has a 10-horsepower restriction on motors.

Boat Launch: Trailer Improved

Fish Species: Smallmouth Bass, Yellow Perch, Northern Pike, Walleye

NYS DEC Special Regulations

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Taylor Pond

Taylor Pond has a great population of salmon and trout. Taylor Pond sees annual stockings of salmon and trout to maintain the great populations. Every year landlocked salmon, red salmon, and lake trout are stocked in Taylor Pond. Fishieries biologist believe there could be a state-record lake trout living in the water. Conventional trolling techniques will land lake trout, and trolling streamers in the spring works well for salmon. Smelt imitations are the best lures for both species. There is a paved launch at the DEC campground on Taylor Pond.

Boat Launch: Trailer Unimproved

Fish Species: Lake Trout, LL Salmon

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Lake Kushaqua

Lake Kushaqua is an Adirondack lake that still retains all of its wild mountain feel. Excellent for paddlers, though remote, the Lake is connected to Rainbow Lake, and also Clear Pond. If you're up for some distance paddling, check out all the places you can go here!

Boat Launch: Trailer Improved

Fish Species: Lake Trout, Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike, Walleye

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Debar Pond

A glacial pool south of Malone, Debar Pond is accessed off of County Route 26. There is a short jaunt through the wetlands to the shore, and explorers or anglers would be wise to travel with a canoe or kayak.

Boat Launch: None

Fish Species: Splake, LL Salmon

NYS DEC Special Regulations

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Meacham Lake

Anglers can find splake, brown trout, northern pike, smallmouth bass, and yellow perch in the waters of Meacham Lake. During the spring, look for brown trout and splake near the mouth of Winnebago Creek where fish feed on smelt. Northern pike can be found in the weeds in the lake's southeast end and smallmouth bass are along the rock areas, west shoreline. Anglers are warned that because of mercury contaminents, there is a healthy advisory on yellow perch over 12 inches. To access Meacham Lake, anglers are advised that there is a launch at the state campground, but the campground has poor gradient. To launch a boat you may need to mannually push a boat off the trailer. Canoeists can use the car-top launch near the oulet dam that is off Route 30.

Boat Launch: Trailer Unimproved

Fish Species: Brown Trout, Splake, Smallmouth Bass, Yellow Perch, Northern Pike

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Chazy Lake

Chazy Lake is a great spot for anglers looking for landlocked salmon, rainbows, and lake trout. There is a town boat launch that makes easy access throughout the year. Anglers that visit Chazy Lake will find an abundance of salmon and trout throughout the year. There is a two storey fishery for the lake and the DEC stock it annually. The DEC stocks rainbow trout and landlocked salmon, but the lake trout population is self-sustaining.

Boat Launch: Trailer Improved

Fish Species: Rainbow Trout, Lake Trout, LL Salmon, Smallmouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Lower Chateaugay Lake

The Upper and Lower parts of Chateaugay Lakes are great fishing spots for anglers in the Adirondacks. The two parts are separated by the county lines of Franklin and Clinton Counties. Upper Chateaugay Lake is great for anglers looking to land an assortment of fish. The upper area of the lake is on the Franklin County side and is stocked annually. You can find lake trout, rainbow trout, landlocked salmon, northern pike, and smallmouth bass. The northern pike have been growing every year in size and reaching 20 pounds. The smallmouth bass are found primarily in the rocky areas around the lake. THe DEC stock the lake annually with trout and salmon. To access the upper part of the lake anglers have access to the DEC launch in the Narrows. The Narrows are in the middle between the upper and lower parts of the lake.

Boat Launch: Trailer Improved

Fish Species: Smallmouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch, Northern Pike

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Mountain View Lake

Mountain View Lake and Indian Lake are connected through a navigable channel. Mountain View Lake and Indian Lake are great for anglers searching for northern pike and largemouth bass. There is a nagivable channel that connects the two bodies of water. Mountain View Lake has an abundance of weeds and stumps to house the pike and largemouths. Anglers can access Mountain View Lake at the car-top launch on the west side of the lake. Indian Lake has a small launch in the northwest corner of the lake. Indian Lake is very popular for recreational boaters so mornings in the fall and spring are the best times.

Boat Launch: Trailer Unimproved

Fish Species: Largemouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch, Northern Pike

NYS DEC Special Regulations

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Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a natural, freshwater lake in North America, located mainly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the Canada - United States border in the Canadian province of Quebec.

The New York portion of the Champlain Valley includes the eastern portions of Clinton County and Essex County. Most of this area is part of the Adirondack Park, offering tremendous views of the High Peaks region and many recreational opportunities in the park and along the relatively undeveloped coast line of Lake Champlain. The city of Plattsburgh is to the north and the historic village of Ticonderoga in the southern part of the region.

Boat Launch: Trailer Improved

Fish Species: Lake Trout, LL Salmon, Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bass, Yellow Perch, Crappie, Northern Pike, Carp, Channel Catfish

NYS DEC Special Regulations

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Upper Chateaugay Lake


The Upper and Lower parts of Chateaugay Lakes are great fishing spots for anglers in the Adirondacks. The two parts are separated by the county lines of Franklin and Clinton Counties. Upper Chateaugay Lake is great for anglers looking to land an assortment of fish. The upper area of the lake is on the Franklin County side and is stocked annually. You can find lake trout, rainbow trout, landlocked salmon, northern pike, and smallmouth bass. The northern pike have been growing every year in size and reaching 20 pounds. The smallmouth bass are found primarily in the rocky areas around the lake. THe DEC stock the lake anually with trout and salmon. To access the upper part of the lake anglers have access to the DEC launch in the Narrows. The Narrows are in the middle between the upper and lower parts of the lake.

Boat Launch: Trailer Improved

Fish Species: Rainbow Trout, Lake Trout, LL Salmon, Smallmouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch, Northern Pike

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Lake Ozonia

A shallower lake, Lake Ozonia has a lot of excellent bass to catch! There is a car top boat launch at the north end, and the pristine water is perfect for swimming, fishing, or just looking at!

Boat Launch: Hand Launch

Fish Species: Rainbow Trout, Splake, LL Salmon, Smallmouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch

NYS DEC Special Regulations

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Santa Clara Flow

The Santa Clara Flow is a wide section of the Saint Regis River at the village of Santa Clara. There's a state boat launch just south of 458 at the northern end of the flow, It's a good spot to start exploring!

Boat Launch: Trailer Improved

Fish Species: Northern Pike

NYS DEC Special Regulations

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Stark Falls Reservoir

The Raquette River Impoundments is eight reservoirs on the Raquette River created by hydroelectric dams. Carry Falls, Stark Falls, Blake Falls, Rainbow Falls, Five Falls, South Colton, Highley Flow, and Colton Flow are the reservoirs that make up the impoundments. The most popular species in the waters are smallmouth bass, walleye, yellow perch, and northern pike. Carry Falls and Stark Falls will also hold tiger muskie. The largest reservoir is Carry Falls and covers 3,170 acres in a wilderness setting. The bodies of water are located in St. Lawrence County, with the most northern point being in the Colton, NY. Every reservoir has public access and each one has a boat launch. Some of the reservoirs has a camground on the waterfront also.

Boat Launch: Trailer Unimproved

Fish Species: Smallmouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch, Northern Pike, Walleye

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Carry Falls

The largest reservoir in the Raquette River Impoundments Carry Falls, covers 3,170 acres in a wilderness setting. Located in St. Lawrence County, Carry Falls Has a public access including a boat launch. The most popular species in the waters are smallmouth bass, walleye, yellow perch, and northern pike. Carry also holds tiger muskie.

Boat Launch: Trailer Unimproved

Fish Species: Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch, Northern Pike, Walleye

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Rainbow Falls

The Raquette River Impoundments is eight reservoirs on the Raquette River created by hydroelectric dams. Carry Falls, Stark Falls, Blake Falls, Rainbow Falls, Five Falls, South Colton, Highley Flow, and Colton Flow are the reservoirs that make up the impoundments. The most popular species in the waters are smallmouth bass, walleye, yellow perch, and northern pike. Carry Falls and Stark Falls will also hold tiger muskie. The largest reservoir is Carry Falls and covers 3,170 acres in a wilderness setting. The bodies of water are located in St. Lawrence County, with the miost northern point being in the Colton, NY. Every reservoir has public access and each one has a boat launch. Some of the reservoirs has a camground on the waterfront also.

Boat Launch: Trailer Unimproved

Fish Species: Largemouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch, Crappie, Northern Pike, Chain Pickerel, Walleye

NYS DEC Special Regulations

NYS DEC Contour Map

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Rivers and Streams

Ausable River

The Ausable River - divided into East and West branches - is one of the finest trout rivers in the East. Although the East Branch is fishable, the best fishing is in the West Branch, formed by the confluence of Marcy and South Meadow brooks. The West Branch flows north for 36 miles until it meets the East Branch in the town of Au Sable Forks to form the main stem of the Ausable River. Along the way, it passes the Olympic Ski Jumping Complex just off New York 73, and continues along River Road until it drops beneath the New York 86 bridge.

Fish Species: Brown Trout*, Rainbow Trout*

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Salmon River

The Salmon River is without a doubt, the most famous salmon and steelhead river in the entire northeast. The salmon river is hydro electrically controlled and the water levels can vary based on rainfall, snow melt or drought. There is 13 miles of public access and 2 miles of privately controlled access where anglers can purchase a daily access pass. Labor Day weekend signals the start of salmon season with a scheduled water release. With the increase in water level the salmon begin their annual migration. Most of the true spawning areas/gravel bars are upstream of the Pineville bridge and that's where the bulk of these fish end up. Chinooks and Coho are fall spawners and they die after spawning. By November they are pretty much gone.

Fish Species: Brook Trout, Brown Trout*

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North Branch Saranac River

The North Branch of the Saranac River is a great quality fishing location for trout in the Adirondacks. Anglers will find decent populations of brown trout, brook trout, and rainbow trout. The biggest fish will be in the section from the mouth of Cold Brook upstream to Alder Brook. Anglers must use artificial lures here though. The best access spots are between Oregon Brook and Clayburg, the section that flows from Clinton to Franklin County. While Stocked annually by the DEC, the river also maintains a native population of Brook Trout. Some Bushwhacking may be necessary.

Fish Species: Brook Trout, Brown Trout*

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Saranac River

With two catch, and release areas, plenty of public access, multiple special regulations sections, the Saranac has no lack of angling opportunities. Spoken of in many classic pieces of angling literature dating back to the early 1900's, the Saranac receives little mention today. Often referred to as the little brother to the Ausable. This could not be further from the truth. The Saranac is a mighty river with many faces to show. Beginning its path in the High Peaks a few miles from the headwaters of the Ausable, the Saranac flows through the village of Saranac Lake. With its several hydroelectric dams along its way, the first one beginning in the village of Saranac Lake setting the stage for many wonderful surprises along its path to the mouth of the river at Lake Champlain. Arguably the Saranac has benefited from these dams where often you will find both warm, and cold water species intermingling together. The variety, abundance of food, and feeding habits of fish in the Saranac will bewilder the most seasoned anglers.

Fish Species: Brown Trout*, Rainbow Trout*, Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bass, Sunfish, Yellow Perch, Crappie, Northern Pike, Walleye

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Little Salmon River

The Little Salmon River is the western branch to the Salmon River and runs from the Canadian border to the Twin Ponds. The Little Salmon River is a western branch of the Salmon River and is best known for the large brown trout population. The river is wadable with quality "pocket fishing" areas for opportunity. The upstream section of the river has some of the best fishing spots in the Adirondacks for wild brown and brook trout. The most popular access location is the road crossing between Route 11 and Route 11B

Fish Species: Brown Trout

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St. Regis River

The St. Regis River spills out of Lower St. Regis Lake and winds northward for about 80 miles before crossing into Canada. Roughly the first 30 miles of the river - that segment upstream from Nicholville - is bona fide trout water. Below Nicholville, smallmouth bass and walleyes are the dominant species. Water temperatures on most of the St. Regis are marginally warm in July and August.

Fish Species: Brook Trout, Brown Trout*, Rainbow Trout*

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Oswegatchie River

The Oswegatchie River flows from Gouverneur to Ogdensburg where it meets the St. Lawrence River. There are more than 70 miles of water on the Oswegatchie that provide some great fishing opportunities. Smallmouth Bass and Walleye are the primary species of fish that are targeted on the Oswegatchie. Smallmouth Bass respond well to live minnows and tube-jigs, and can be found near fallen trees and boulders that offer protection. Walleye can be taken on shallow-diving minnow plugs, as well as crawler-tip jigs. Cast towards dropoffs, quick currents and deep holes near the rapids for the best results. Access to the water can be found at numerous sites along this river.

Fish Species: Smallmouth Bass, Walleye

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« Back to the Adirondack Lakes Guide

Photo Credit: Michael Tracy

Sources:
http://www.dec.ny.gov/pubs/103457.html
http://apa.ny.gov/gis/index.html
http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9920.html