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What's New In the Adirondacks

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Earlier this week, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced that he, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT) all approve of the controversial plan to remove 34 miles of railroad track between Lake Placid and Tupper Lake and build a multi-use trail in its place. Mere hours after the announcement of state support, a lawsuit that has been filed against the plan was publicized

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Rowers can rejoice - the Village of Champlain's summer rowing program on the Great Chazy River is set to resume next month.

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Back in 2012, Plattsburgh's paved, multi-use Saranac River Trail opened and increased accessibility throughout the city for walkers and bicyclists. Now, the city of Plattsburgh is ready to move forward with the next stage of the trail's development, which will ultimately double its length!

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Photo courtesy of Friends of Saranac River Trail
Plans for a walking and biking trail between two Adirondack villages are set to be wrapped up within the next month or two, as funding details are ironed out. The proposed trail will allow pedestrians a safe place to commute from one municipality to another.

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Editor's Note 5/18/16: This story has been updated to reflect approval by Governor Cuomo, the DEC, and the DOT.

Three months ago, the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) approved a plan to replace 34 miles of railroad track between Lake Placid and Tupper Lake with a multi-use trail, seemingly putting an end to the lengthy rails vs. trails debate. After taking time to review the plan and consider public opinion, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced that he, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT) have all signed off on the final plan.

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Many know the name Thoreau and are familiar with his book Walden; or, Life in the Woods (1854), but here in the Adirondacks, a different name is associated with wilderness living: "Woodswoman" Anne LaBastille. LaBastille lived on a 32-acre tract in the Adirondacks, and her Twitchell Lake "West of Wind" property was recently donated to New York State so it may be preserved and protected, as LaBastille wished.

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Summer is the perfect season to go camping, particularly in the Adirondack Park where campsites are plentiful. If you've already reserved a spot at Caroga Lake Campground, be aware, because the DEC plans to close down 51 of 161 of the area's campsites so they can conduct a major renovation.

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To see a historic site restored to its former glory is always a welcome sight. Thanks to the New York State DEC, one of the most distinguished and popular landmarks in the Adirondacks will undergo maintenance and renovations to preserve it for future generations.

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Photo courtesy of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
If you're an organic (naturally grown) producer, whether you're a new farmer or well established, consider checking out the reputable Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers Market. The Market is currently looking for additional vendors who follow organic practices to help it keep up with the demand.

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They say history repeats itself, and in a recent court decision regarding paddlers' rights in the Adirondacks, that saying proved to be true. New York's highest court, the Court of Appeals, cited a lack of evidence in its decision to send a case back to a lower court for trial, the same fate that met a similar case in the 1990s.

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